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Schedule

Programme

Plenary
speakers

We are delighted to announce our plenary speakers for the conference: 

Prof. Dr. Ulrike Gut, University of Münster

Corpus Phonology: Exploring Standard Scottish English

This talk introduces one of the latest approaches within corpus linguistics: corpus phonology, i.e. the use of phonological corpora for the study of phonetic and phonological properties of languages and accents (e.g. Durand, Gut & Kristoffersen 2014). In the first part, both a brief overview of this new line of research and a description of the components of a phonological corpus (raw data, annotations) will be given. In the second part, corpus phonology will be illustrated with the example of three corpus-based studies investigating Standard Scottish English phonology. Using the phonemically annotated ICE Scotland (Schützler, Gut & Fuchs 2017), rhotics and rhoticity, the realisation of the NURSE vowel as well as the /w/-/ʍ/ contrast in Scottish Standard English will be explored. Results show that this variety of English is variably rhotic, that some rhotics are realised as a tap or trill, and that only few speakers show a full NURSE merger, while few of them maintain the /w/-/ʍ/ contrast. In addition, it was found that the realisation of these phonological features is determined more by language-internal than by social factors and that high variability across speakers exists.

Prof. Alessandro Lenci, University of Pisa

Dr. Barbara McGillivray, King's College London

Dr. Sylvia Shaw, University of Westminster

‘Calm down Dear!’ Women’s linguistic participation in UK Political Institutions.

The underrepresentation of women in politics is a persistent and seemingly intractable problem for British politics. In this paper I discuss some of the findings from my 2020 book, Women, Language and Politics in which I attempt to use theoretical and methodological sociolinguistic approaches to discover some of the obstacles and barriers that women in politics face. Researchers of political institutions are greatly helped by the wealth of data available to them in the analysis of political discourse from video recordings and written records to in-situ observation and large searchable datasets. Here I discuss some of the advantages of combining approaches to identify patterns of participation across different institutions. In doing so, I discuss analyses of parliamentary data from The Scottish Parliament; the Northern Ireland Assembly; the Welsh Assembly and the House of Commons. I also consider some of the pitfalls with conducting gender and language research, including oversimplifying the notion of a ‘women’s’ or ‘men’s style of speech, and failing to recognise the ideological underpinnings of beliefs about gendered behaviour.

Workshops

There will be two workshops on Wednesday 27th:

1) Comparing cross-linguistic complexity (online and face-to-face)

2) Hands-on session on Corpus Linguistics with R (face-to-face only)

Social programme

On Thursday afternoon, we will have a brief boat trip on the river Cam followed by a Pimms & pizza gathering at OtherSyde, overlooking the river. 

On Friday evening, our conference dinner will be held at Jesus College. There will be a bar and a disco after dinner.

Both social events are included in the registration costs.

Here is a broad outline of the four days of the conference. A list of accepted papers is available here (PDF).

Wednesday 27 July

Workshops

5pm Opening ceremony and welcome reception

Thursday 28 July

Morning plenary

Coffee break

Morning sessions

Lunch

Afternoon sessions

Coffee

Industry panel: researchers from small and large companies on what linguists can bring to AI and

NLP work

Boat trip to Cambridge Museum of Technology (drinks and nibbles)

Friday 29 July

Morning plenary

Coffee break

Morning sessions

Lunch

Afternoon sessions

Coffee

Afternoon plenary

Conference dinner & disco

Saturday 30 July

Morning plenary

Coffee break

Morning sessions

Lunch

Afternoon sessions

Coffee

Assembly and closing ceremony